Posted by: JC Gatlin | June 13, 2010

Essential Lean Reading

 

“The Toyota Way” by Jeffrey Liker

How to speed up business processes, improve quality, and cut costs in any industry

In factories around the world, Toyota consistently makes the highest-quality cars with the fewest defects of any competing manufacturer, while using fewer man-hours, less on-hand inventory, and half the floor space of its competitors. The Toyota Way is the first book for a general audience that explains the management principles and business philosophy behind Toyota’s worldwide reputation for quality and reliability.

Complete with profiles of organizations that have successfully adopted Toyota’s principles, this book shows managers in every industry how to improve business processes by:

  • Eliminating wasted time and resources
  • Building quality into workplace systems
  • Finding low-cost but reliable alternatives to expensive new technology
  • Producing in small quantities
  • Turning every employee into a quality control inspector

And of course the 4-P model (Process, Philosophy, People/Partners and Problem Solving), the four interdependent components essential for long-term success.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The Toyota Way Field Book by Jeffrey Liker and David Meier

Jeffrey Liker first revealed the management principles Toyota’s worldwide reputation for quality and reliability in the international bestseller The Toyota Way.

Now, he and Toyota veteran David Meier take those lessons a step further with The Toyota Way Fieldbook. You’ll receive the diagnostic tools, worksheets, and exercises–many adapted from Toyota originals–so you can craft the most effective approach for your organization.

Learn how to develop a long-term philosophy of cost reduction, build a culture that stops to fix problems quickly, develop leaders that live your system, and transform your company into a true lean learning organization that continuously improves, meets the needs of its customers, and positions itself for long-term success.

Most importantly, you’ll understand the thinking behind lean tools and approaches so you can implement Toyota’s 4P Model for success in your organization:

Philosophy–The company is a vehicle for adding value to customers, society, the community, and its associates.

Process–When leaders follow the right process they get the right results, including long-term cost-reduction and quality improvement.

People and Partners–Add value to an organization by challenging its people and partners to grow and become more skilled and confident.

Problem solving–Continuously solve root problems to drive organizational learning.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation by James P. Womack and Daniel T. Jones

In the revised and updated edition of Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation, authors James P. Womack and Daniel T. Jones provide a thoughtful expansion upon their value-based business system based on the Toyota model. Along the way they update their action plan in light of new research and the increasing globalization of manufacturing, and they revisit some of their key case studies (most of which still derive, however, from the automotive, aerospace, and other manufacturing industries).

The core of the lean model remains the same in the new edition. All businesses must define the “value” that they produce as the product that best suits customer needs. The leaders must then identify and clarify the “value stream,” the nexus of actions to bring the product through problems solving, information management, and physical transformation tasks. Next, “lean enterprise” lines up suppliers with this value stream. “Flow” traces the product across departments. “Pull” then activates the flow as the business re-orients towards the pull of the customer’s needs. Finally, with the company reengineered towards its core value in a flow process, the business re-orients towards “perfection,” rooting out all the remaining muda (Japanese for “waste”) in the system.

Despite the authors’ claims to “actionable principles for creating lasting value in any business during any business conditions,” the lean model is not demonstrated with broad applications in the service or retail industries. But those manager’s whose needs resonate with those described in the Lean Thinking case studies will find a host of practical guidelines for streamlining their processes and achieving manufacturing efficiencies. –Patrick O’Kelley, Amazon.com Review

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Lean: Lessons from the Road by Jamie Flinchbaugh and Andy Carlino

Hitchhikers do not travel a fixed path. They intentionally wander so they can learn and grow along the way. Embarking on the lean journey is similar, there are many roads on which to wander and no single one is right for all. “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Lean: Lessons from the Road” reveals the most critical lessons learned over the authors’ combined 30-plus years of exploring the lean highways. One of the book’s lessons from the road is you need to pay attention to where you are and where you are going, just as you do when driving a car. Lean leaders add value by changing things, moving them forward, and producing different results than the day before. To lead, you must go beyond creating a vision. You must develop the vehicle that will deliver it. “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Lean” is the vehicle that will help you move beyond the tools and take lean to a self-sustaining and continuously improving level. The book’s 10 chapters cover lean principles and thinking, lean leadership moves, the roadmap for lean transformation, common pitfalls of lean journeys, building an operating system, lean accounting, lean material management, lean in service organizations, and how individuals can apply lean to improve themselves. The book concludes with interviews of lean practitioners on the front lines of change at Chrysler, Ross Controls, DTE Energy, RSR Corporation, and Nemak.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Creating a Lean Culture: Tools to Sustain Lean Conversions by David Mann

Now empowered with five more years of accumulated knowledge and experience, David Mann’s seminal work: 

  • Offers new insights on applications of lean management in administrative, technical, and professional environments
  • Provides new guidance on how to begin implementing lean management in discrete manufacturing, office, and process manufacturing environments.
  • Details specifics on how to engage executives through gemba walks*
  • Shows the difference between measuring improvement through results and through processes
  • Adds new case studies throughout
  • Expands the lean management assessment based on actual use, and now offers up two separate versions (both available online) one for manufacturing and one for administrative, technical, and professional settings

*In a gemba walk, a teacher, or sensei, and student walk the production floor. The teacher asks the student to tell what he or she sees and, depending on the answer, asks more questions to stimulate the student to think differently about what is in front of him or her. This includes learning to see what is not there…Gemba walks often include assignments to act on what the student has come to see. …

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The New Lean Pocket Guide XL [Spiral-bound] by Don Tapping

The most comprehensive and practical explanation of Lean concepts and tools made for the shop floor is now available in a larger format. The New Lean Pocket Guide XL has over 120 illustrations to visually convey the tools and concepts, along with detailed descriptions of all the Lean tools. This newer and larger version of the best selling The Lean Pocket Guide also includes: a section on Lean Office and Six Sigma, 20+ digital photos demonstrating Lean in action, a Waste Audit, and a Glossary of Lean terms. The tools of 5S, value stream mapping, document tagging, continuous flow, standard work, visual control, takt time, pitch, runners, waste, plus numerous other Lean tools are thoroughly defined as well as guidelines provided for the implementation of each tool.  This version has digital photos of Lean production best practices throughout!

© June 2010 Homebuilding Partners, Inc.   twitter-logo

Advertisements

Responses

  1. […] The Toyota Way Field Book by leanhomebuilding.wordpress.com […]

  2. […] The Toyota Way Field Book by leanhomebuilding.wordpress.com […]

  3. […] The Toyota Way Field Book by leanhomebuilding.wordpress.com […]

  4. […] The Toyota Way Field Book by leanhomebuilding.wordpress.com […]

  5. […] The Toyota Way Field Book by leanhomebuilding.wordpress.com […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: